The Promise

By AstridBeeMom

I told myself I wouldn’t cry. I didn’t want to scare her. I didn’t want her to think this stranger was emotionally unstable. Then I worried if I didn’t let myself cry she’d think maybe I was emotionally inept.

I changed my shirt 3 times. I was about to change it a fourth time when I decided that nothing would be good enough so I may as well save myself the trouble. I spent a great deal of time worrying that she’d find me reprehensible or think, “This lady is ugly. I got handed some bad genes.”

I spent days cleaning the house. I couldn’t seem to get it clean enough. Never mind that teenagers hardly pay attention to details such as clean baseboards, I was sure she would glance down and think, “this house is too dirty. I can’t stay in such filth.”

I loaded our little family into the truck and we stopped by the florist. My husband, her father, wanted to have roses for the first time he held his “baby who’s not a baby anymore” in his arms again.

I handed him the card to fill out and watched him hesitate and struggle for the right words. “Just write ‘Love, J’” I instructed him. Relief washed over his face and he did what I said.

When we arrived at the airport I thought maybe I was dreaming. There was no way I could be this lucky. In just a few short moments she would be standing face to face with us. It felt as if we were holding the winning lottery ticket. Guilt briefly touched my heart as I thought of my other first mom friends, women I have grown to love, who don’t have what I was about to or who may never will. What did I ever do to deserve to be this lucky?

The text message came. “We’re about to land.” I looked out the window of the airport and saw a plane coming in from the right direction. As it came closer I glanced at my husband. He looked terrified. As it’s wheels touched the ground his eyes became red and the tears could no longer be contained.

I told myself I wouldn’t cry. He was making this plan harder to stick to.

People could be seen walking down the long corridor, behind glass doors. A man in a suit, a woman in a dress. They were hard to distinguish until they were closer.

But I spotted her before anyone would think I could definitively say it was her. I knew it was. I pointed. She came closer. Her gait was as familiar as my own. The way she swung her arms was like looking in a mirror.

The first moment I saw her

I wanted to run through the gate doors, airport security be damned! Her pace quickened as she saw us all standing and waiting. We were completely oblivious to other passengers as we blocked the way out with our bodies.

And then she was in my arms. I couldn’t stop the tears and hers flowed freely as well. I momentarily pulled away to put my hands on her face and stare into her striking eyes. She. Is. Amazingly. Beautiful.

She was in my arms again. She was real. I could feel her. The warmth of her body. The texture of her hair on my face. Could it ever get any better than this? This moment would never happen again. This was it. It was absolute perfection. Divine.

Over the years a song had always stuck in my head and reminded me of her. I had dreamed of this moment for years. And in my dreams the song would play. I now know how fitting the song is.

“Together again

It would feel so good to be

In your arms

Where all my journeys end

If you can make a promise

If it’s one that you can keep

I vow to come for you

If you wait for me”

-The Promise, by Tracy Chapman

Filed under: Adoption – Generalized, Reunion

Read at the Source: : Musings of a Birthmom

      

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About the Author

Astrid Beemom
"I am a mother to four parented children, first mother to one beautiful daughter, and wife to my husband. In my free time I hang out with my little Yorkie mix and my aloof Siamese cat. I blog mostly about all things related to adoption and it does focus more on unethical adoptions and practices within the adoption industry. My own adoption story was conducted quite ethically, in my opinion, but that does not take away from the reform that is still needed. I co-manage a birthmothers support group, as well as a couple birth family and adoptee support groups online. I believe it is through sharing and learning, from all sides, that real change can happen. I was not forced (unless you count my circumstances, that left me with no choice) into adoption, but I know many who were. And regardless of how ethical my child’s adoption was handled, it still sucks to be forced by circumstances to that “choice.” Occasionally I will blog about other aspects of my life. Above all else I believe it is essential for the voices of the adoptee and birth families to be heard." FInd Astrid at : http://musingsofabirthmom.com/

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